Tag Archive for Korea consulting franchise

Everything Korea: May 2 Episode, Part 2 Globally Mandated Programs

As I pointed out in Part 1 of this series, recognizing there will be challenges is one thing, providing a solid solution is another. I’d like to address these and other issues when we look at Globally Mandated Program.

It is always best that globally developed and mandated programs are crafted to mesh and align well in support local operations…

So what are my recommendations?   I’d be happy to share just a sample for consideration.

First all programs should:

  • Recognize the need for visual content to reflect our diversity– Low vs. high-context presentations, plus inclusive of individuals of Color, Ethnicity and Gender.  (In many cases, I find global content is very White).
  • Get high-level local leadership input and support (vs. just input from workinglevel team.)
  • Programs regardless of the content should align with local operations. Forexample with corporate culture, efforts should allow the local organizations to define their own corporate culture, and the global content developed to beflexible and easily incorporated into current training initiatives like New Employee Orientation and mandatory compliance workshops.
  • Avoid hiring an outside agency to craft, they rarely get True Vision–they   understand the Data, but not Context.  They may add credibility and professional look and feel, but to be cost effective, they usually plug Data into a generic Boiler Plate.
  • Craft content in a way to connect to a wide segment of the workforce including  “The New Creative Class.” (See my case study on topic and who they are).  Here is the Link. Creative Class Case Study
  • The program should be launched in a way that dazzles and impresses the local teams and leadership.  Sadly I have seen well-crafted program presented poorly.

Concluding Thought  

Shared globally programs can align an organization and serve as a compass to steer the respective teams forward.  It is also a daunting task and one requiring a sound plan and execution.

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For questions raised, Stacey, my personal assistant at stacey@koreabcw.com can coordinate a time for us to chat by phone, meet or handle by email.

Would you like a copy of my book Korea Facing: Secrets for Success In Korean Global Business?   Click Here

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Everything Korea, April 18 Episode: the Toolbox, a Global Approach, and Creatives

This week I’d like to share three reports. All focus on Korea business. All easily accessed…read or download

….From the Korea-facing Global Business Toolbox: Strategies and Tactics

This report shares my recent thoughts on top strategies and tactics for tackling Korean facing global business. Note global is emphasized, since working outside Korea within local subsidiary operations is my primary focus and specialty.

https://www.scribd.com/doc/302653498/From-the-Korea-facing-Global-Business-Toolbox-Strategies-and-Tactics

A Global Approach: For Korea Management Teams

This Case Study provides a roadmap and best practices to their Korean management and overseas divisions. This includes new Korean brands eager to launch their products and services outside Korea.  The study is also applicable to those established Korean brands already in overseas markets who could benefit from benchmarking “what works” and “what doesn’t.”

https://www.scribd.com/doc/286823722/A-Global-Approach-For-Korea-Management-Teams

The Challenges and Gaps in a Creative Workplace Culture: U.S. and Korea

The role of the creative class continues to pique my interest. In particular, I am drawn to uncovering the “culture” needed to foster the Creative Mind Process.

https://www.scribd.com/doc/271936685/Creative-Workplace-Culture-U-S-and-Korea

Oh, one more thing, in case you missed The Hyundai GalloperShinhwa, Myth and Legend, it is now available.  Just go to http://unbouncepages.com/galloper/

Here’s a short lead into the article.

With the introduction of Genesis Motors Company in premium luxury car segment as well as the Hyundai Motor’s IONIQ, part of an expanded model lineup of hybrid and electric vehicles, many in the industry see these as bold moves by the Hyundai Motor Group and it leadership. Actually, it is but the latest chapter in a story and a legacy reaching back decades.

For questions raised, Stacey, my personal assistant at stacey@koreabcw.com can coordinate a time for us to chat by phone or handle by email.

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Everything Korea, March 28 Episode: Genesis Motor and a ‘New York’ concept

My lens is cultural. From that perspective, consumables can tell us much about a society. Korean premium and upmarket trends are an area I research and follow carefully.

New York

In reflecting back on more than 15 years of writing on the topic especially related to the Korean car market and specifically Hyundai Motor Company, I was honored to attend the New York International Auto Show and the unveiling of Genesis Motor ‘New York’ concept car.

G brand 2

The premium brand launched its first model, the G90 (badged as EQ900 in Korea), in January with plans for 6 models in the line-up by 2020. We can expect to see elements of the well–received ‘New York’ concept in future Genesis Motor models.

G brand 1

The brand reflects Luxury Evolving, with a human-centered focus connecting mobility with cutting edge technology.

From a cultural perspective and although the design team is very global, plus heavily influenced by its German leadership, I see these brand qualities aligning well with the modern strengths and aspirations of South Korea.

Connect Deeper

Interested in how I work with companies and in particular Genesis, Stacey, my personal assistant at stacey@koreabcw.com can coordinate a time for us to chat.

Getting my weekly newsletter?  

If not, here’s the link to subscribe.  Look for exclusive insights and opinions. http://forms.aweber.com/form/64/2141090564.htm

 

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Everything Korea, March 21, Resources

From time to time I like to share some of the many resources we offer.

These range from 8 years of Vodcasts and special presentations on YouTube @ https://www.youtube.com/user/ds19192/videos

In PDF versions of a number of my books and articles are offered @ https://www.scribd.com/user/15590167/Don-Southerton

And over 1200 Blogger posts @  http://bridgingculturekorea.blogspot.com

We invite you to visit, view aHardCovernd download. So take some time and dig deeper. This said, we look for your comments and questions.

One more thing, I attending the New York Auto Show this week, so next week look for my comments on the show with a focus on the new Hyundai IONIQ line and Genesis Motor brand, as well as Kia Motors sharp looking Cadenza (K7).

Connect Deeper

For questions, Stacey, my personal assistant at stacey@koreabcw.com can coordinate a time for us to chat by phone or handle by email.

 

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Everything Korea, Episode March 14, the Workarounds

Addressing issues from a cultural perspective, in most cases the only workarounds that we have and I can suggest are centered on education for Western teams working with Korean teams.

Western co-workers need educated in and be sensitive to the Korean communications style. With less an emphasis on formal channels, in the Korean workplace considerable information is shared informally throughout the often-extended workday.

Foremost, the Korean workplace is ever changing, priorities shift day to day and even throughout the day.  For example, a directive might be altered after being requested—or the mission better defined or clarified.

Since change is frequent, many Korean expatriates working in local operations will refrain from sharing developing issues early on. To Americans for example it may appear they have been sitting on information that could have been shared much earlier—while in actuality instead of false starts, Korean expats want to make sure before engaging the local team.

An added dimension can also be Korea’s balli balli, which was topic of one of the past commentaries, and worth mentioning once again. It translates as hurry-hurry.  Actually, balli means hurry, but the word is always used in tandem adding to the need to move fast. It’s a defacto core value— with everything from immediately responding to requests for data to launching major projects.  More to the point, it means things need to get done today and now, not tomorrow.  I see balli balli also perpetuating a culture of waiting to the last minute.

Even in the best cases, expect that Korean teams may want to postpone any local decision until they can carefully review and perhaps confer with Korea.

To improve communications, I suggest all relevant information be forwarded to the Korean teams. I’d create a sense of urgency with a “suggested” timeline for execution and implementation. Regardless, plan on some delays, be patient and know that once a go-ahead is given the expectation is the task is executed immediately… if not sooner ☺

Over the years, I’ve found that Korean teams appreciate when their overseas co-workers recognize their internal processes and why they postpone taking action to the very last minute…. I’d also be ready to offer as needed supportive data or documents as the situations unfold.

For questions, Stacey, my personal assistant at stacey@koreabcw.com can coordinate a time for us to chat by phone or handle by email.

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Everything Korea, February 29:  The “Why” Behind Seeking Alternatives

Another lesson from my Korea facing Global Business Toolbox

More than a decade ago during a group session I hosted for overseas Korean and western senior managers, the discussion turned to the “role” of the westerners on teams engaged in local project development. The local western teams felt very under-utilized and wanted to contribute more. This, of course, was a source of considerable frustration for the westerners because their previous automotive OEM employers had given them considerable responsibility with little direct oversight and more fully utilized their experience and expertise.

Pondering for a moment during the discussion, a senior Korean pointed out that local input was respected, but perhaps this needed to be better communicated. The Korean manager went on to explain that his Korean teams knew how to do things “Korean style”, but what was needed were other ways of approaching work related issues.

Even if the local ideas were not adopted, senior management reviewed those options and took them into consideration. In fact, Korean leadership had high trust in the local teams and their judgment–the local team providing much-needed expertise and know-how.

More recently in early 2016, a senior Korean leader I have been mentoring echoed the similar sentiment.  First, how local input was to be sought out and encouraged across the organization. And, second that seeking out “alternatives” was one of the company’s core tenets transcending the Group’s more contemporary updated values—but in actually deeply rooted solidly in the corporate culture.  

The takeaway –share wherever possible other ways of approaching work related issues.

In closing, if you have questions regarding my Toolbox or Interested in how I work with companies? Stacey, my personal assistant at stacey@koreabcw.com can coordinate a time for us to chat.

Getting my weekly newsletter?  

If not, here’s the link to subscribe.  Look for exclusive insights and opinions. http://forms.aweber.com/form/64/2141090564.htm

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Everything Korea, February 15, Episode, Balli Balli

Digging in my global Korea Facing Toolbox: The Defacto Korean Core Value

Many of us are familiar with the Korean term, balli balli. It translates as hurry-hurry. Actually, balli means hurry, but it word is always used in tandem adding to the need to move fast. I first recall hearing the word in the 1970s in martial arts class– my Korean instructor at times commanding we move faster in executing a kicking drills.

balli-balli

To many Korean firms balli balli it’s a defacto core value— with everything fromimmediately responding to requests for data to launching major projects. More to the point, it means things need to get done today and now, not tomorrow.

For westerners, moving fast can often be a concern-conflicting with the Westernbusiness model of careful meticulous study and planning before implementation.

In fact, one complaint voiced with frustration by my Korean clients is how slow Westerners move on projects. In turn, my Western clients shake their head and argue Koreans want to jump into a project or situation with little preparation.…. and balli balli seems to perpetuate a culture of waiting to the last minute.

More Than Meets the Eye…

Observing the Korean model for years, I have come to see where moving faster may be more than meets the eye. In fact, it’s very entrepreneurial trait. When one shortens the time needed to complete a project, the focus is then on identifying the critical tasks that contribute most and with quickly moving on to execution.

In contrast, the longer the deadline, the more time gets spent in analysis and discussions with an ever-lessening focus on the task. The phenomenon is a corollary to Parkinson’s Law (i.e. “work expands so as to fill the time available for its completion”). In particular, we find end productivity and quality are equal or higher with a shorter deadline due to greater focus.

In my next commentary, and recognizing balli balli is a trait of Korean business, I’ll share what most Korean leadership would like to see included in their requests – and something rarely provided.

Interested in how I work with companies, Stacey, my personal assistant at stacey@koreabcw.com can coordinate a time for us to chat.

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If not, here’s the link to subscribe. Look for exclusive insights and opinions.

http://forms.aweber.com/form/64/2141090564.htm

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Everything Korea: February 8 Episode, a Korea-facing Format

From my Korea-facing Business Toolbox…

In the mid-2000s, I was on-boarding a new senior executive who had been recruited from Toyota by my Korea-facing client.  In one of the first mentoring sessions, he asked for the Cover Page template for the Korean company having learned to use a Toyota SOP A4 template for all reports and proposals.  

I knew the Korean company had a format for Korean language cover pages used in the reporting process to management, but I had not seen one in English.  In fact, Western teams crafted reports for Korea, but one of the roles for the Korean expatriate coordinators assigned to local operations was translated and formatted these report for the HQ.  

In particular, the cover page is a standardized A4 landscape layout so management can skim over quickly and get the gist. In needed, they can then dig deeper into the report deck.

Building on this, I suggest a similar format can be used in sharing reports with Korean teams and management.  More so, it works well when used in conjunction with my 2 strategies.  See the past Two Vodcasts, here are the YouTube links.

Strategy #1   https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IYfCj115VMc

Strategy #2  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yPoyD_ussuc

Interested in the template?  Stacey, my personal assistant at stacey@koreabcw.com can coordinate a time for us to chat.

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If not, here’s the link to subscribe.  Look for exclusive insights and opinions. http://forms.aweber.com/form/64/2141090564.htm

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Everything Korea, Episode January 25, the Second Strategy

This week I’ll be sharing the second of my time-proven approaches to Korea facing business.

This strategy is taking a Pilot or Trial Approach…. Recognizing the strong Korean cultural risk avoidance tendencies, I recommend offering a limited trial program as an option to mitigate fears and concerns—with costs scaled down proportionately from a bolder rollout.  Depending on the project, this often can be demonstrated in a test market or dialed back to limit in scope.

In all cases, the pilot program needs to be flexible to expand in stages with associated incremental costs.

There is one caveat to this approach I often see taken in Korea.  Once they test market a project and then decide to move forward, they execute a full rollout incredibly fast.  My advice is to plan accordingly in advance with an action plan that includes a rapid roll out…. the faster the better.

This said, and as many of you have probably surmised, Strategy 1 and 2 do work well in tandem. This begs the question, “So what would I add to ensure success?”

In particular, as a next step I would present the two strategies in a special format for Korean leadership. In fact, I’ll cover this in my next commentary.

In closing, if you have questions on implementing the strategies I have outlined, Stacey, my personal assistant at stacey@koreabcw.com can schedule us for a time.

Oh, one more thing, the Lunar New Year.

As you may know Korea (as well as China and Vietnam) celebrate two New Years’– one on Jan. 1 and the Lunar New Year celebration, which this year falls on February

7th to 10th. Following Korean zodiac tradition this is the Year of the Red Monkey. A year of energy, liveliness and success. More on the Lunar New Years and appropriate greeting in the next post, too.

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Everything Korea: January 18 Episode, Strategy #1

Last week I promised to share my strategies for tackling Korean facing business.

Strategy #1

First, instead of the common western approach founded in considerable upfront research, discussion and review in which a sole, singular course of action is recommended—it’s best to instead prepare three options with their related costs.

This approach allows Korean senior management to consider alternatives, a common decision-making methodology in Korea.

Some background on “Why 3 options?”  Stepping back to the mid-2000s and a joint American and Korean management workshop that I facilitated for a client, one of Korean team managers pointed out that in Korea it was norm to present multiple options. He explained that to support their leadership’s decision-making at least 3 options would be prepared for his seniors… and as many as 5 if the proposal was going to be elevated for review by their Chairman.

In most cases, following this initial presentation, leadership would ask for additional details requiring the team to drill deeper prior to a decision. All said, this process resulted in an approved course of action.

I also recall how not following this model can have consequence. I was called upon by a frequent Agency of the Year winner to assist in dealing with their Korean client and a relationship troubling the agency’s dedicated account team.  Probing, I found the agency had presented what they felt was the best plan for their client—a well thought out global branding campaign for which the agency was confident in their decision.

The Korean client feedback was less than expected and came as a shock to the agency team. In my asking, and of little surprise to me, the Korean client was disappointed and had high hopes for a range of ideas from the agency.  They had expected to be dazzled with creativity and not just a single idea. In my opinion this was driven by the advertising agency’s world class and award-winning creative reputation.

In following up with the Korean client, I recommended the agency also present the preliminary concept work which they had developed internally prior to picking what they felt was the best. This would allow the client to have voice in the decision. Sadly, the agency was rigid in their thinking, feeling they had submitted their top work and that was sufficient. Not surprisingly, they parted ways some time later.

Again, presenting options is key. Next week, I’ll share a second Strategy, so in the meantime if you have specific questions on how best to format and present presenting options, I’d be happy to discuss.

Stacey, my personal assistant at stacey@koreabcw.com can schedule us for a time. Getting my weekly newsletter?

Getting my weekly newsletter?If not, here’s the link to subscribe. Look for exclusive insights and opinions.

If not, here’s the link to subscribe. Look for exclusive insights and opinions.

http://forms.aweber.com/form/64/2141090564.htm

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